At the School Board’s Sept. 9 meeting, Superintendent Hardy Murphy summarized methodologies to determine baseline information for the 37 goals contained in the District’s five-year strategic plan. One method involves performing a random sample “audit” of lesson plans or observations to determine baseline data. After the inititial baseline data is determined, the difference between that percentage and 95 percent would be used to prorate expected progress over the remaining years of the plan.

As an example, one goal of the strategic plan is to “Successfully implement a program of differentiated instruction and enrichment that will address the needs of each individual student.” The District proposes to conduct a random sample audit of “appraisal observations and lesson plans to determine baseline data,” which will provide the percentage of classrooms in which effective differentiated instruction was taking place. “After the initial baseline is determined, the difference between that percentage in the random sample and 95 percent will be used to prorate expected progress over the remaining years of the plan.”

The second method involves using parent or teacher surveys to determine baseline data. As an example, one goal of the strategic plan is to “Provide a comprehensive staff development program for all staff members that will address the priority needs of the District and differentiated skills and needs of staff.” The District proposes to determine the baseline for this goal by assessing the degree of staff satisfaction with the District’s professional development programs. Then, after the initial baseline is determined, “the difference between that percentage of satisfaction and 95 percent will be used to prorate expected progress over the remaining years of the plan.”

“That’s essentially the methodology we’ve used throughout all this document,” said Dr. Murphy.

“Reporting on the data is going to be rather significant,” he said. “We talked about contracting with people to do the surveys, we may need to contract with people to do some of these audits.”