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The City of Evanston will be co-sponsoring the Evanston Distracted Driving Summit on Wednesday, April 13 from 2;30 to 5:30 p.m. at Evanston Township High School, Room N112, 1600 Dodge Ave.

Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White is invited as a speaker at this summit that will highlight in-depth discussion and expert-led direction about distracted driving; driving simulators; how to minimize risk, distraction, and liability; why phones and driving don’t mix; and tips on how to PUT IT DOWN!

Hosts and Sponsors include AAA Chicago, Active Transportation Alliance, Allstate Foundation, American Defensive Driving School, ETHS Safety Department, Evanston City Council, Evanston Police Department, FocusDriven, National Safety Council and Northwestern University’s Traffic Safety School. For more information, e-mail communications@cityofevanston.org.

Did You Know?
Research on distracted driving reveals some surprising facts:

  • 20 percent of injury crashes in 2009 involved reports of distracted driving. (NHTSA).
  • Of those killed in distracted-driving-related crashed, 995 involved reports of a cell phone as a distraction (18% of fatalities in distraction-related crashes). (NHTSA).
  • In 2009, 5,474 people were killed in U.S. roadways and an estimated additional 448,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes that were reported to have involved distracted driving. (FARS and GES).
  • The age group with the greatest proportion of distracted drivers was the under-20 age group – 16 percent of all drivers younger than 20 involved in fatal crashes were reported to have been distracted while driving. (NHTSA).
  • Drivers who use hand-held devices are four times as likely to get into crashes serious enough to injure themselves. (Source: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety).
  • Using a cell phone use while driving, whether it’s hand-held or hands-free, delays a driver’s reactions as much as having a blood alcohol concentration at the legal limit of .08 percent. (Source: University of Utah).
  • Learn more at www.distraction.gov.