In the real estate section of the April 13 issue of one of the major Chicago papers there was a larger-than-half-page, very complimentary article about a new apartment building close to completion at 1720 Central St. 

Many readers will remember this as the site of the former Central Theater –
a favorite movie theater. The article praised the building highly and was one of the rare articles that not only praised a building but included a most thorough description, including its surroundings and neighbors and listing details such as the drainage, shopping and schools.

Each description is extraordinarily complete and makes one wonder how such an amazing construction came to be built in Evanston rather than a higher-priced area such as the near north side of Chicago.

Despite the many descriptions, there is a glaring omission: the designing architect. 

If this building is so well done, so well built and has such great features, it seems the author of this success should at least be made known.

The building’s policy on pets is available, but not the materials that were used to create the building envelope and present the building to the world. The end result of the article seems to deal with details of the building while excluding the face it presents to the world and how the perfect harmony of the building came about. And the designing architect is anonymous.

Ironically, one suspects that if a serious problem arises that might spur the negative interest of the public and especially if a lawsuit ensues, the architect’s name will suddenly emerge and become known negatively far and wide. 

It seems that architects are professionals who work in an unknown world where, unless they are celebrities, they are unknown, unthanked, unnamed and rarely become known – unless they are involved in a serious problem.

A designer who worked with a builder to complete a project seen by a major newspaper as worthy of broad, complimentary coverage should have a name.  Maybe one day. Maybe.