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During the month of February, the Evanston Public Library will promote reading to our youngest children through a winter reading program, “Winter Words: Read and Talk with Your Young Child.” The program is specifically aimed at children from birth through age 3 years.

Early exposure to words, language and reading is now understood to be a key component of future success in school and beyond. In 2014, The American Academy of Pediatrics, which represents 62,000 pediatricians, made it policy to promote reading to children from birth. Studies show that children who are talked to frequently from birth are significantly better prepared for school success. 

Parents and caregivers are encouraged to come to any location of the Evanston Public Library to participate in the program with young children in their care. “Winter Words” includes a reading log, prize books, staff recommendations of books to read and a fun craft. The Library will also pilot the program at a small number of home daycare facilities in the community and reach out to families with very young children throughout the community.

The New York Times reported that “according to a federal government survey of children’s health, 60 percent of American children from families with incomes at least 400 percent of the federal poverty threshold — $94,400 for a family of four – are read to daily from birth to 5 years of age, compared with around a third of children from families living below the poverty line, $23,850 for a family of four.”

“We can all give our youngest children a big advantage through the simple of act of reading. This program provides motivation and tools to support all parents and caregivers in reading and developing vocabulary in their babies whose minds are hungry to learn, right from the start,” said Karen Danczak Lyons, Director, Evanston Public Library.

During the month of February, the Evanston Public Library will promote reading to our youngest children through a winter reading program, “Winter Words: Read and Talk with Your Young Child.” The program is specifically aimed at children from birth through age 3 years.

Early exposure to words, language and reading is now understood to be a key component of future success in school and beyond. In 2014, The American Academy of Pediatrics, which represents 62,000 pediatricians, made it policy to promote reading to children from birth. Studies show that children who are talked to frequently from birth are significantly better prepared for school success. 

Parents and caregivers are encouraged to come to any location of the Evanston Public Library to participate in the program with young children in their care. “Winter Words” includes a reading log, prize books, staff recommendations of books to read and a fun craft. The Library will also pilot the program at a small number of home daycare facilities in the community and reach out to families with very young children throughout the community.

The New York Times reported that “according to a federal government survey of children’s health, 60 percent of American children from families with incomes at least 400 percent of the federal poverty threshold — $94,400 for a family of four – are read to daily from birth to 5 years of age, compared with around a third of children from families living below the poverty line, $23,850 for a family of four.”

“We can all give our youngest children a big advantage through the simple of act of reading. This program provides motivation and tools to support all parents and caregivers in reading and developing vocabulary in their babies whose minds are hungry to learn, right from the start,” said Karen Danczak Lyons, Director, Evanston Public Library.

During the month of February, the Evanston Public Library will promote reading to our youngest children through a winter reading program, “Winter Words: Read and Talk with Your Young Child.” The program is specifically aimed at children from birth through age 3 years.

Early exposure to words, language and reading is now understood to be a key component of future success in school and beyond. In 2014, The American Academy of Pediatrics, which represents 62,000 pediatricians, made it policy to promote reading to children from birth. Studies show that children who are talked to frequently from birth are significantly better prepared for school success. 

Parents and caregivers are encouraged to come to any location of the Evanston Public Library to participate in the program with young children in their care. “Winter Words” includes a reading log, prize books, staff recommendations of books to read and a fun craft. The Library will also pilot the program at a small number of home daycare facilities in the community and reach out to families with very young children throughout the community.

The New York Times reported that “according to a federal government survey of children’s health, 60 percent of American children from families with incomes at least 400 percent of the federal poverty threshold — $94,400 for a family of four – are read to daily from birth to 5 years of age, compared with around a third of children from families living below the poverty line, $23,850 for a family of four.”

“We can all give our youngest children a big advantage through the simple of act of reading. This program provides motivation and tools to support all parents and caregivers in reading and developing vocabulary in their babies whose minds are hungry to learn, right from the start,” said Karen Danczak Lyons, Director, Evanston Public Library.