March is Women’s History Month, a time to respect and appreciate women of all types and the contributions and achievements women have made and continue to make. 

Dora was not a pretty woman, but Dora knew that she “was built.”  Just ask her.  To accentuate her positives, Dora wore clothes so tight that observers wondered if she “used a shoehorn to get into them.”

(Um, um, um.) 

To make sure the world saw that she was “well-endowed” up top, Dora wore low-cut tops or dresses that exposed more than enough flesh.

When some women occasionally tried to caution Dora about her provocative dress, Dora just laughed and told them that they were jealous, that they wished they had the body that she had.  (“If one is so impressed with one’s self, others don’t have to be.” Mary’s World, 2017)

Dora got a lot of flattery and attention from men as she swished by, and although this male attention gave Dora some satisfaction, it was not enduring.  No need to say why. 

(Um, um, um.)

Well, one night Dora decided to attend a town meeting.  It was her first time.  Men grinned and greeted her as she swished in while most of the women rolled their eyes and sucked their teeth at her.  Dora seemed oblivious to all of them. 

When the subject of senior residents experiencing problems came up, Dora raised her hand to speak and walked – not swished – to the podium.  The male officials smiled as they gazed upon her. 

“I have a mother that is a senior,” Dora said, “Seniors should be respected and treated right.  I think our town needs to create a town committee that will help seniors deal with their problems, and I would be more than willing to serve on it.” 

Oh my goodness. 

Was this Dora speaking?  Could it be that Dora was not the empty-headed bimbo that people assumed she was? 

Men and women applauded. A motion was made and seconded to create the committee. 

Dora returned to her seat, head held high while swishing for all it was worth.  Men grinned at her, and women gave her crocodile smiles. 

Dora had displayed a side of her that no one knew she had.  She had been a book judged by its cover.