So here’ s my #1 frustration with working at Evanston Public Library. It’s not the people; they’re great. And it’s not the collection, since I absolutely love what we already have on hand and what I’m able to get. No, for me, my frustration stems from all the incredible things we provide that nobody has even heard of. You know that self-published authors can get their ebooks into the library through Biblioboard, right? Or that harried parents have access to an untold wealth of picture book-to-film adaptations through Bookflix, right? No? Well, what about NoveList? Surely you know about NoveList, yes? No.

Time to change all that.

Today I’m going to introduce you to NoveList. Head on over to the Library’s website (epl.org, but you already knew that) and you’ ll see the category “Explore” and, under that heading, “Resources A to Z.” Select those words and you’ll see the full list of every database we own. And just look at those beauties. Free access to Consumer Reports. Free access to Mango to learn a new language. Free genealogy resources. But today we’re going down to NoveList. Click on that, and voila.

Now NoveList is useful when you want a good book recommendation. Did you enjoy “The Woman in the Window?” Want something like that? Do a search on it and you’ll see that it offers you “Title Read-a-likes” written by real people that justify why “Sometimes I Lie” by Alice Feeny may be the perfect next book for you. But that’s not all it provides. You can refine your results so that you’re considering only books with certain tones, characters, writing styles or time periods. Go on. Explore. Because the likelihood you’ll find something is strong. Here are the stats:

# titles in NoveList: 460,566 (print); 76,559 (audio)

# titles added each month on average, about 2,900,

# titles in NoveList: 460,566 (print); 76,559 (audio)

# titles added each month: on average, about 2,900,

NoveList has a genre heading for “Weird Westerns” – think zombies gun-slinging at the old saloon.

Our librarians here at Evanston Public Library are great at recommendations, but if you’re sitting at home looking for something to read, consider NoveList as the next best thing.

And now, some fast facts:

• Most popular appeal factor? “Fast-paced” is the most-frequently applied appeal term• Most unusual appeal factor? “Anthropomorphic” characters – bunnies acting like people in picture books for kids, or cats solving mysteries• First NoveList customer: Joyce Saricks, with Downers Grove Public LibraryNoveList has subject headings for both humanoid and non-humanoid aliens.