By Peggy Tarr

It is March, Women’s History Month, a month to honor women for their accomplishments and contributions to history, culture, society, and support of each other. It is a time to love, honor, and show respect for women and have compassion for their challenges. 

About a week ago, I walked down Central Street to Curt’s Café. It was not planned. I had just missed the bus at the bus stop a few blocks away from the café. I decided to walk to another bus stop rather than wait there for the next bus. When I reached the stop near Curt’s Café, I still had some time before the next bus would arrive. ‘Well,” I thought, “I might as well go into Curt’s Café and buy something.”

I bought a couple of scones, which turned out to be delicious, and paid for them with a $20 bill, the only cash I had on me.  I received a ten-dollar bill in my change. I asked the cashier if I could have two fives instead but was told that they did not have any fives at that time. A woman who had just come in said, “I have two fives.”  I went over to her and we exchanged my ten for her two fives. I thanked her and exited Curt’s Café to wait for my bus.

 When the woman exited, she came up to me and asked if I needed a ride and that she could give me a ride. The woman mentioned that she frequently drove her grandmother places because she did not have a license or a car. 

I assumed it was my white hair that made her mention her grandmother.

I thanked her but told her that I was going to the library and that the bus would drop me off right there and that taking the bus gave me a sense of independence (I had had both COVID-19 vaccinations). 

I told her my name and that I write for the Evanston RoundTable. I then asked her name. I have never been good at remembering names, but I think she said her name was “Annie.” 

Well, Annie, thank you again for being so helpful, polite and showing your compassion for seniors regardless of race.  Annie appeared to be white, and I am definitely Black. 

Annie, a woman of merit.

 

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