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  1. Rev Dr. Nabors implies that the achievement gap for Black and Brown students is the due to a lack of equity justice. “Now finally with a Black superintendent and a Black school board president we can break down the walls ……. “. Interesting on the 2021 SEssentials survey the biggest jump was in student teacher trust up21%. Supportive environment was up 15% On the Annual ETHS achievement report 96% of the students said they agree or strongly agree that teachers respect them. I don’t see “the walls” the Rev Dr. Nabors insist must come down for Black and Brown students to achieve

  2. All due respect to Rev. Nabors, but his characterization of the process that went into the hiring of the superintendent is quite tendentious.

    These are the facts:
    – There was only one candidate who was interviewed, rather than a slate of candidates which has been standard practice in the District for years.
    – There were NO opportunities for the general public to interact with and evaluate the candidate.
    -There were NO opportunities for the general public to share their opinions of the candidate.
    – The candidate was not publicly named until after the offer was made to the superintendent.

    This was an opaque process that went against precedence and good practice for transparency and community engagement.

    What the board should have done was to bring in a slate of 2-3 finalists to town and have public meetings. Then have opportunities for public input on the finalists. That is what happened when Superintendents Murphy and Goren were hired. Of course, Rev. Nabors–as a newcomer to the community–may not have been aware of that.

    The board claimed at the time that the secretive process was needed to “attract the best candidates,” assuming that people with jobs didn’t want to alienate their current employers. This is a ludicrous assumption. The current superintendent, in fact, had been actively interviewing in places with public searches like Grand Rapids MI and Rochester NY where other candidates were preferred and offered the position.

    The current superintendent came to Evanston as product of a flawed and secretive search. That is a fact.

    When you hire an administrative head in that fashion you are undoubtedly going to be met with a skeptical public and employee population.

    1. I appreciate your response. Though I disagree, it is simply wonderful to disagree and not be disagreeable. Dialogue and diplomacy are the twin giants for moving forward.

      1. Thank you for your thoughtful perspective and mature handling of an important debate within our community, a community that is both proud of the steps it has been taking and aware of the long path ahead for greater equity.

  3. I have many problems with a local Rev throwing a tenured school principal under the bus in name of racial equity that so far has shown disastrous results for all kids (see last weeks Tribune article on post pandemic testing results). If D65 is so great, why does he send his kids to a private schools? It’s pretty obvious. Evanston needs to look past the rhetoric and start listening to the real stakeholders – kids, parents, teachers and principals. I am not sure how Rev Nabors is part of this group.

    1. I also appreciate your response to my perspective. I wish you knew me better, then you’d know that my son is a senior at ETHS where he has spent the last four years, and my oldest daughter spent her senior year when we arrived here six years ago. I’m also grateful that some of my children’s education has been spent in Montessori schools, both here and in Michigan. And of course, I didn’t throw anyone under the bus. I responded to a public essay, as you are. I do not feel offended by anything you wrote. It is not about me.