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  1. Re: privilege – I heard the expression, “Assume innocence” years ago. I have two good friends and some relatives for over 50 years who are clever with money, married well, and have a wealthy life. If the one with an ocean-going yacht said, “should we take the boat out today?” that is exactly what she means. She isn’t trying to diminish me. The one with a champion dressage horse (in Florida for the winter) and a full-sized arena tells me about her horse every time we talk because he is her life. I am glad to hear about her trials and triumphs. They know my financial status, and still there are plenty of grounds for a rich friendship. I don’t mean to sound preachy and apologize in advance if I do. I think some wealthy people are show-offs (more money than I can spend with all the hunger and homelessness in the world) and some are just being who they are.

  2. I am not a realtor either but gave up on the house search for the time being. Walking into a house with walls colored bright red, dark blue and in one instance black made me do a calculation of how much it would cost to have the walls taken out, new drywall installed, and new paint in a neutral color to match our art collection. Not only would this cost a great deal of money, but it would take months to even find the professionals to do the work. The same goes for dark cabinets in the kitchen, dated appliances and unfinished basements. The other situations that turned me off when searching for a small house in Evanston were power strips everywhere, no place to put a kitchen trash bin except out in the open, poorly maintained yards, trees that needed pruning – The list goes on and on.