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  • School District 65 2019 Achievement Report: Big Drop in Students Who Are Kindergarten Ready, No Gains in College Readiness
    “Rather than jump immediately to pointing fingers at the immediate culprit that is the school district for the responsibility for our children, just remember that we as a community play an incredible role in the education of all of our children." (If you are reading this on the RoundTable's mobile app, click WEBSITE so tables and charts appear.)
  • Student Achievement Flat at ETHS, Little Good News
    The news was neither positive nor new; the gap in test scores between white and minority students continued, and scores overall for most subgroups in the class of 2019 were lower than those of their 2018 counterparts. (If you are reading this on a mobile app, click WEBSITE to read more.)
  • Developing a Segregated Town, 1900-1960

    Unlike many suburbs that sought to exclude African Americans altogether, leading members of Evanston’s real estate establishment played a role in the growth of Evanston’s African American community. ... There was a major caveat, though. Mr. Wiese says, “Evanston’s white real estate brokers apparently developed a practice of informal racial zoning. In effect, they treated a section of west Evanston as open to African Americans, while excluding them from the rest of town.”

  • Foster School, virtually an all-Black school in 1966, was closed as a neighborhood school in 1967 as part of the District’s desegregation plan, and it was closed altogether in 1979.
  • The Federal Housing Administration's Role in Segregating and Cutting Off Mortgage Financing for Black Families in Chicago, 1934-1960
    This article examines FHA’s underwriting policies and practices that promoted segregation in Chicago, limited the supply of housing to Black people in Chicago, and cut off mortgage financing to Black people in Chicago between 1934 and 1960.
  • In recent years, Paul Zavitkovsky, a researcher and leadership coach at the Center for Urban Education Leadership Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, noticed that MAP tests are generating significantly higher results than those generated by the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) and the Illinois PARCC tests. This is important because School District 65 uses the MAP test to measure achievement and growth of its third- through eighth-graders.
  • The Nature of the Achievement Gap at District 65, And the Scope of the Opportunity Gap
    While Figure 1 reflects that District 65 has one of the largest achievement gaps in the nation, Dr. Reardon’s study shows that black students in District 65 have, on average, scored significantly better than black students in Berkeley and Atlanta, and better than 78% of the school districts in the nation. In addition, in calculating the socioeconomic status (SES) rating for black students in District 65 that is shown in Figure 1, Dr. Reardon used a median income of $55,535 for black families who had students attending the District. District 65’s free-lunch data, though, suggests that the median income of black families with students attending the District may be two-thirds that amount. In addition, in calculating the socioeconomic status (SES) rating for black students in District 65 that is shown in Figure 1, Dr. Reardon used a median income of $55,535 for black families who had students attending the District. District 65’s free-lunch data, though, suggests that the median income of black families with students attending the District may be two-thirds that amount.
  • Erie Family Health Center Helps Build Young Minds Through Reach Out and Read Program
    For the last nine years, Erie Family Health Center has been a partner with the Reach Out and Read program, a national program designed to encourage parents to read to their children, from infancy through age 5. When Erie established a new clinic at 1285 Hartrey Ave. in Evanston in 2013, the program was implemented there.Under the program, doctors or nurse practitioners give families who bring in their children, ages 0-5, an age-appropriate book and help them understand the importance of reading aloud to their children. Importantly, they give parents suggestions on ways to interact with their children while reading.
  • The amount of affordable housing in Evanston has steadily declined in the last decade, making it difficult for low- and moderate-income households to locate here. In addition, 86% of the low- and moderate income households who currently reside here are paying more in housing costs than is viewed as being sustainable.
  • Continuing scientific research demonstrates that early childhood experiences leave chemical signatures on genes that affect how easily the genes are turned “on” or “off.” In this way, early childhood experiences combine with genes and the environment to physically shape the architecture of a child’s brain.
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